Pupil Premium

Key Facts


• The Pupil Premium is allocated to children from low-income families who are currently known to be eligible for FSM in both mainstream and non-mainstream settings and children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months.
• The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011, and paid to local authorities by means of a specific grant based on January 2011 school census figures for pupils registered as eligible for FSM in reception to Year 11. For Looked After Children, the Pupil Premium was calculated using the Children Looked After data returns (SSDA903).
• The level of the premium in 2011-12 was £488 per pupil for pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) and for pupils in care who have been continuously looked after for six months. It increased to £600 per pupil in 2012-13 and to £900 per child for 2013-2014. For the academic year 2014-2015, it was £1,300 per child who has received Free School Meals at any time during the last 6 years. For 2015-2016, it was £1,320 and remains at that rate for the coming year.
• Local authorities are responsible for Looked After Children in care and will make payments to schools and academies where an eligible looked after child is on roll. Currently this is £1,900 per child.
• Service Premium - A premium has also been introduced for children whose parents are currently serving in the armed forces; this was £200 in 2011-12, rose to £250 for 2012-13 and is currently £300 per child. This service premium is designed to address the emotional and social well-being of these pupils.
• From April 2016-April 2017 the Pupil Premium budget is £197,140. It is important to recognise that the Pupil Premium funding is not the only income that we deploy to support groups of learners and that much of what we have already in place is aimed at “narrowing the gap.” Long before the Pupil Premium was introduced the Governors, the Head Teacher and staff at Newtons provided a wide range of support for families and children aimed at working closely in partnership to improve academic outcomes for all pupils, especially those at risk of falling behind.
The leadership of the school has always endeavoured to employ staff able to deliver the best opportunities to the pupils. It has sought to retain its most experienced and enthusiastic teachers whilst nurturing the professional development of new teachers.
Not all pupil premium children are behind in their learning but we need to put things in place for these children and the government is also clear about what we should be doing for these pupils in terms of identification, tracking, evidencing their performance, showing that pupil premium funding has been used to raise their aspirations by mentoring programs and evidencing curriculum enrichment activities that they benefit from.

Ways in which we use Pupil Premium at Newtons Primary school:
We aim to deploy the Pupil Premium Funding Grant to ensure that we are successful in narrowing the gap and raising achievement for those children from low income and or/other disadvantaged backgrounds.
Action to Date
• All teaching staff are aware of those children entitled to Pupil Premium and they are being clearly identified on all tracking data so that progress can be monitored.
• We have employed new members of staff to work solely on narrowing the gap and are utilising the expertise of existing members of staff to work creatively to motivate and inspire our children. We believe that by reducing the size of the class that class teachers have to teach and by withdrawing children for a short period of time to go back over work they have not understood, we will better meet the needs of all pupils regardless of whether they are FSM or not.
• Every teacher has a Teaching Assistant for 17 ½ hours per week.
• Read, Write, Inc was introduced in October 2011 for all children in Foundation Stage and Key Stage. Almost half of our Year 2 children are no longer on the programme.
• No Read, Write , Inc groups have more than 12 children in them and the lowest number is 5.
• All members of staff are trained to deliver Read, Write, Inc. and new members of staff receive this training.
• We use provision mapping to support the process of planning additional interventions.
• We make sure that all children have access to high quality teaching.
• Speech and Language programmes are used for groups of children, delivered by two trained Teaching Assistants.
• We develop role play opportunities to develop language and communication skills, especially in FS and Year 1 – We recognise that early intervention is vital.
• A trained Teaching Assistant works with EAL children new to the school.
• Support is given to children with challenging behaviour, when it is needed, so that they can access the curriculum.
• We have a Full-time Home School Support Worker who works closely with families to ensure that our children reach their personal best.
Effectiveness of Pupil Premium Funding
To continue to “narrow the gap”, we have put an extra teacher into Year 6 and have started Booster sessions in the first half of the Autumn term (usually we start them after Autumn half term). We have also put an additional teacher into Year 5 for Literacy and Numeracy

Data Summary End of Year 2015 – 2016

Pupil Premium vs Non Pupil Premium

EYFS

58% of the children achieved GLD.

14 of 20 PP children achieved GLD (70%)

19 of 38 non PP children achieved GLD (50%)

 

Year 1 Phonics Screening

84% of the children reached the expected standard. 

12 of 17 PP children passed the threshold (71%)

30 of 33 non PP children passed the threshold (91%)

 

Year 2 SATs

The year group had 26 PP children and 22 non PP children. 

Reading

56% of children reached the expected level or higher with 15% working at greater depth

14 children (54%) of PP children reached the expected level or higher with 2 children (8%) working at greater depth.

13 children (59%) of non PP children reached the expected level or higher with 5 children (23%) working at greater depth.

Writing

40% of children reached the expected level or higher with 8% working at greater depth

9 children (35%) of PP children reached the expected level or higher with 1 child (4%) working at greater depth.

10 children (45%) of non PP children reached the expected level or higher with 3 children (14%) working at greater depth.

Maths

54% of children reached the expected level or higher with 8% working at greater depth

13 children (50%) of PP children reached the expected level or higher with 1 child (4%) working at greater depth.

13 children (59%) of non PP children reached the expected level or higher with 3 children (14%) working at greater depth.

Year 6 SATs

The year group had 23 PP children (all of which counted in the progress measures) and 26 non PP children (3 of whom didn’t count in the progress measures for Maths and Writing and 4 of whom didn’t count in the progress measures for reading). 

Our combined score was 37%.

7 (30%) of our PP children achieved combined.

11 (42%) of our non PP children achieved combined.

 

Progress Measures

 

School

PP

Non PP

Reading

-1.9

-2.75

-1.07

Writing

-0.1

-1.12

0.91

Maths

-1.1

-2.48

0.28

 

APS – Scaled Scores

 

School

PP

Non PP

Reading

98

96.4

100.1

Writing

n/a

97.2

100.5

Maths

100

97.3

102

GPS

102

98.4

104.8

 

 2015KS1

PP 2015

 

Pupil Premium KS2

APS 2015

 

PP Newtons (17 children)

PP

National

 

Difference

Non PP Newtons

(28 children)

Non PP National

Difference

Difference between Newtons’ PP and Non PP

Difference between National PP and Non PP

Reading

25.6

27.6

-2.0

29.1

29.6

-0.5

-3.5

-2.0

Writing

23.1

26.6

-3.5

28.3

28.9

-0.6

-5.2

-2.3

Maths

25.2

27.3

-2.1

28.5

29.8

-1.3

-3.3

-2.5

Combined

24.8

27.2

-2.4

28.6

29.5

-0.9

-4.2

-2.3

SPAG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pupil Premium KS2

Expected Progress 2015

 

PP Newtons

PP

National

 

Difference

Non PP Newtons

 

Non PP National

Difference

Difference between Newtons’ PP and Non PP

Difference between National PP and Non PP

R

82%

88%

-6%

100%

92%

+8%

-18%

-12%

W

94%

92%

+4%

100%

95%

+5%

-6%

-3%

M

82%

86%

+4%

96%

91%

+5%

-14%

-5%

 

 

 Average Points Score – Pupil Premium KS1
2014

PP 2014

Pupil Premium KS2

APS 2014

 

PP Newtons (23 children)

PP

National

 

Difference

Non PP Newtons

(10 children)

Non PP National

Difference

Difference between Newtons’ PP and Non PP

Difference between National PP and Non PP

R

27.8

27.5

+0.3

27.0

29.7

-2.7

+0.8

-2.4

W

27.6

27.0

+0.6

27.2

29.4

-2.2

+0.4

-2.4

M

27.8

27.2

+0.6

28.8

29.8

-1.0

-1.0

-2.6

Combined

27.6

27.0

+0.6

27.2

29.4

-2.2

+0.4

-2.4

SPAG

29.1

26.9

+0.8

29.4

29.4

0

-0.3

-2.5

 

Progress 2014

 

PP Newtons

PP

National

 

Difference

Reading

90%

86%

+4%

Writing

80%

86%

-6%

Maths

95%

90%

+5%

 

Click here to download the Pupil Premium Policy.